2010-2011:

Fall, 2010: A Midsummer Night's Drama by William Shakespeare with script by Lynn Brant


The addition of a ton of new costumes and a revised script made this a very colorful production!

IMG5615
IMG5617
IMG5618
IMG5619
IMG1253
IMG1252
IMG1273
IMG3300
IMG3296
IMG3312
IMG3328
IMG3353
IMG3344
IMG3359
IMG3391
IMG3402
IMG3406
IMG3429
IMG3416
IMG3438
IMG3466
IMG3470
IMG3474
IMG3479
IMG3493
IMG3501
IMG3512
IMG3552
IMG3569
IMG3626
IMG3647
IMG3669
IMG3700
IMG3708
IMG3717
IMG3802
IMG3814
IMG3818
IMG3873
IMG3905
IMG3911
IMG3934
IMG3963
IMG3995
IMG4004
IMG4044
IMG4097
IMG4104
IMG5641
IMG5643
IMG5646
IMG5647
IMG5658
IMG5699
IMG5707

 

Spring, 2011: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella


Another famous princess took the stage in the spring---and with her came lots of technical challenges, like a carriage, horses, multiple mice, a pumpkin patch and a magic costume change!

DSCN1626
DSCN1628
IMG0315
IMG0313
IMG0321
DSCN1630
DSCN1631
IMG0323
IMG0357
DSCN1640
IMG0355
DSCN1638
DSCN1636
DSCN1635
IMG0457
IMG0475
IMG0376
IMG0402
IMG0412
IMG0424
IMG0439
IMG0482
IMG0491
IMG0503
IMG0514
IMG0522
IMG0535
IMG0542
IMG0547
IMG0556
IMG0572
IMG0618
IMG0649
IMG0667
IMG0673
IMG0675
IMG0683
IMG0700
IMG0707
IMG0718
IMG0721
IMG0765
IMG0797
IMG0800
IMG0806
IMG0985
IMG1075
IMG1108
IMG1140
IMG1143
IMG3822
IMG3829
IMG5999
IMG6120
IMG6151
IMG6285
IMG6281
IMG6276

Fall, 2011

"Have you ever wondered what would happen if Monty Python met up with Mel Brooks to tell their version of Robin Hood? Well...um...poor Sherwood Forest would never be the same again." —Flint Youth Theatre, Flint, Michigan

"It sure is hard to be humble when you're a swashbuckling, egocentric super-hero. But our gallant guy-in-green tries his best as he swaggers through The Somewhat True Tale of Robin Hood, a frantically funny, Monty Pythonesque retelling of the classic. This time around, the legendary legend, in his never-ending quest to aid the needy, encounters a lovely damsel-in-distress (oddly obsessed with skin conditions); an ever-scheming sheriff who would rather bowl a strike than hit a bull's-eye; a gold-hoarding, bad-guy monarch wannabe; and a good-natured "Town's Guy" who manages to make his way into every scene, whether he belongs there or not. Combine them with an expandable band of spoon-wielding Merry Men whose collective IQs equal six, and you've got an irreverent jaunt through Sherwood Forest you won't soon forget!" --Dramatic Publishing (www.dramaticpublishing.com)

This was our second production of this hilarious take on the Robin Hood legend, and it was just as fun this time!  Featuring a giant tree (see poster) as the central set for Sherwood, the show featured all sorts of opportunities for great characterization, from Josh Rathbun's Sheriff of Nottingham, Blaine Shearer as Prince John, Alice Hiemstra's over dramatic Maid Marion and Jim Myers as Robin Hood.  Combine that with a whole group of Fawning Ladies and a troop of Merry Men that would rather eat Twinkies and you can't help but have fun!

 

 

DSC0638
DSC0629
DSC0598
DSC0531
DSC0532
DSC0519
DSC0511
DSC0419
DSC0678
DSC0659
DSC0669
3007373013420732264061000005184641721167490937861124n
30520430134386989289310000051846417211674991332658303n
3761493013430432263091000005184641721167493262749345n
390898101503566725325076322925068307714275519292n
3156643013428798929921000005184641721167492979440642n
3777491015035674835750763229250683082591176672501n
IMG6304
IMG6305
IMG6308
IMG6314
IMG6318
IMG6320
IMG6327
IMG6326
IMG6328
IMG6333
IMG6340
IMG6344
IMG6351
IMG6356
IMG6361
IMG6358
IMG6362
IMG6366
IMG6367
IMG6371
IMG6373
IMG6381
IMG6383
IMG6385
IMG6387
IMG6392
IMG6416
IMG6424
IMG6428
IMG6434
IMG6441
IMG6442
IMG6448
IMG6474
IMG6488
IMG6494
IMG6501
IMG6503

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter, 2011: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Drama 2 class)


A class project, this play turned out to be a challenge to do in just class time, but we had fun putting some people on stage that hadn't done it before and not even trying to pretend that our dwarfs were short--because they weren't!

IMG6627
IMG6630
IMG6632
IMG6635
IMG6636
IMG6638
IMG6641
IMG6642
IMG6643
IMG6645
IMG6646
IMG6647
IMG6648
IMG6656
IMG6658
IMG6663
IMG6665
IMG6667
IMG6670
IMG6672
IMG6679
IMG6683
IMG6689
IMG6692
IMG6694
IMG6697
IMG6703
IMG6704
IMG6705
IMG6707
IMG6709
IMG6710

 

Spring 2012 

 

We have all seen it, but do you know the history behind this classic show?  It all begins with a novel from the turn of the century, and it weaves through several stage versions, silent films, the 1939 MGM film, and two adaptations of that film on stage—following its own Yellow Brick Road on to our stage in 2012!

 The Wizard of Oz was first turned into a musical extravaganza by L. Frank Baum himself. A loose adaptation of Baum's 1900 novel (there is no Wicked Witch or Toto, and there are some new characters), it first played in Chicago in 1902 and was a success on Broadway the following year. It then toured for seven years.  Two silent film versions were produced in 1910 and 1925, and the seven-minute animated cartoon in 1933. The 1925 version, with which Baum, who had died six years earlier, had no association, made Dorothy a Queen of Oz, rather like the later sci-fi TV miniseries Tin Man.

   "The 1939 film adaptation bore a closer resemblance to the storyline of Baum's original novel than most previous versions. Many details are omitted or altered, while many of the perils that Dorothy encountered in the novel are not at all mentioned in the feature film. Oz, and Dorothy's time there, is real in the book, not just a dream. The Good Witch of the North (who has no name in the book), Glinda the Good Witch of the South, and the Queen of the Field Mice are merged into one omniscient character, Glinda the Good Witch of the North. To take advantage of the new vivid Technicolor process, Dorothy's silver shoes were changed to ruby slippers for the movie. Due to time constraints, a number of incidents from the book, including the Dainty China Country and the Hammerheads, were cut. In L. Frank Baum's original novel, Oz is meant to be a real place, one that Dorothy would return to in his later Oz books and which would later provide a refuge for Aunt Em and Uncle Henry after being unable to pay the mortgage on the new house that was built after the old one really was carried away by the tornado. Also in the novel, the four travelers were required to wear magic spectacles before entering the Emerald City.  The role of the Wicked Witch of the West was also enlarged for the movie (in the book, although she is mentioned several times before, she is only present for one chapter towards the end). This was done to provide more dramatic tension throughout the film, and to unify what is otherwise a very episodic plot. The role and character of Dorothy were also transformed: in the film, she is depicted as a damsel in distress who needs to be rescued, while in the novel, she, a little girl, rescues her friends, in keeping with Baum's feminist sympathies. Although it received largely positive reviews, it was initially a box office failure. The film was MGM's most expensive production up to that time, but its initial release failed to recoup the studio's investment. Subsequent re-releases made up for that, however. It was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture. It lost that award to Gone with the Wind, but won two others, including Best Original Song for "Over the Rainbow".  Telecasts of it began in 1956, re-introducing the film to the public and eventually becoming an annual tradition, making it one of the most famous films ever made.

This was followed, in 1945, by a musical theatre adaptation presented at the St. Louis Municipal Opera (MUNY). The script was adapted by Frank Gabrielson from the novel, but it is influenced in some respects by the motion picture script and uses most of the songs from the film. A new song was added for Dorothy to sing in the Emerald City, called "Evening Star", and the Wizard goes home in a rocket ship instead of a hot air balloon. The Wiz is a 1978 musical film produced by Motown Productions and Universal Pictures. An urbanized retelling of L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz featuring an entirely African-American cast, The Wiz was adapted from the 1975 Broadway musical of the same name. The film follows the adventures of Dorothy, a shy Harlem, New York schoolteacher who finds herself magically transported to the Land of Oz, which resembles a fantasy version of New York City. Befriended by a Scarecrow, (played by a young Michael Jackson) a Tin Man, and a Cowardly Lion, she travels through the land to seek an audience with the mysterious "Wiz", who they say has the power to take her home.

In 1987, the Royal Shakespeare Company revamped the show once more, opening it in London’s Barbican Theater. An additional verse has been put back into the Academy Award-winning song 'Over the Rainbow,' as well as an entire number, 'The Jitterbug,' that was cut from the movie. Every word of the screenplay has been left in, following even more closely the film's screenplay than the 1945 MUNY version and attempting to recreate the film's atmosphere and some of its special effects.

  Our production was the result of months of hard work. The Wizard of Oz has been described as one of the most elaborate musicals that a program can produce, despite its familiarity.  Challenges like scenes that depict everything from a farm in Kansas, a miniature village and a cornfield to three different forests, an entire bustling city and a gothic castle kept all of us using our creativity and working hard.  Add in that most of the actors in the ensemble tonight have an average of 5 costume changes (the only one who doesn’t change at all is Toto!) and the wonderful song and dance, our trip down the Yellow Brick Road was a wonderful challenge!  

 Note: Poster above was from SubPlot Studio (www.subplotstudio.com) and The Wizard of Oz (RSC) is licensed through Tams Witmark (http://www.tamswitmark.com)

Munchkins-Optimized
Leads-Optimized
Pink-Girls-Optimized
Seniors-Optimized
Tech-Crew-Optimized
Witches-Optimized
IMG6717
IMG6718
IMG6720
IMG6723
IMG6727
IMG6729
IMG6731
IMG6732
IMG6734
IMG6736
IMG6738
IMG6740
IMG6741
IMG6743
IMG6744
IMG6747
IMG6748
IMG6752
IMG6762
IMG6763
IMG6766
IMG6768
IMG6770
IMG6769
IMG6773
IMG6779
IMG6781
IMG6782
IMG6784
IMG6783
IMG6789
IMG6815
IMG6818
IMG6822
IMG6830
IMG6832
IMG6833
IMG6834
IMG6859
IMG6901
IMG6904
IMG6932
IMG6963
IMG6973
IMG6960
IMG6962
IMG6961